Chris Eng, Vice President of Research

Chris Eng, vice president of research, is responsible for integrating security expertise into Veracode’s technology. In addition to helping define and prioritize the security feature set of the Veracode service, he consults frequently with customers to discuss and advance their application security initiatives. With over 15 years of experience in application security, Chris brings a wealth of practical expertise to Veracode.

Previously, Chris was a Principal Consultant and Technical Director of @stake (later acquired by Symantec), where he led high-profile security assessments for Fortune 100 companies, with an emphasis on web applications, commercial software, and network infrastructure. His early work laid the foundation for @stake’s application penetration testing methodologies, and he later served as technical leader and global facilitator for Symantec’s Attack and Penetration Center of Excellence. In addition to consulting, Chris led the development of WebProxy, a proprietary web application testing tool designed for security experts, which was later commercialized as an @stake product.

Prior to @stake, Chris was an Electrical Engineer for the US Department of Defense. As a member of the National Security Agency’s “Red Team”, he conducted vulnerability research and performed penetration tests to strengthen the security of US government and military networks. His prior work at the NSA consisted mostly of hardware-related pursuits, with an emphasis on analyzing/testing embedded systems and ASICs.

Chris is a frequent speaker at industry conferences such as BlackHat, RSA, OWASP, and CanSecWest, and has presented on a diverse set of application security topics including cryptographic attacks, testing methodologies, mobile application security, and security metrics. Along with experts from more than 30 US and international cybersecurity organizations, he helped develop the CWE/SANS Top 25 Most Dangerous Programming Errors.

Chris holds a B.S. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the University of California.