This year I’m working with IDG to survey enterprises to understand their application portfolio, how it’s changing and what firms are doing to secure their application infrastructure.

The study found that on average enterprises expect to develop over 340 new applications in the 12 months. As someone that has been working in and around the enterprise software industry for more years than I care to admit here, I find that number astounding. Enterprises really are turning into software companies.

Think about it – how many new applications did software vendors like Microsoft, Oracle, or SAP bring to market in the last 12 months? The number is probably in the hundreds, but you would expect that because they are software vendors. Every application sold is money in their pocket. The more software they make the more opportunities there are for them to increase their revenue and profits.

On average enterprises expect to develop over 340 new applications in 12 months.

So why are enterprises developing as many applications as software vendors? The answer is the same. The more software they make the more opportunities there are for them to increase their revenue and profits. It may not be a short and direct line between software development, revenue and profits like it is for software vendors, but the connection is there otherwise enterprises wouldn’t be doing it.

The problem is that all those applications represent both opportunities and risks for the enterprises developing them. How much risk? It’s hard to say without assessing them for vulnerabilities. However, most of those 300+ new applications will not be assessed for security risks. The survey found that only 37% of enterprise-developed applications are assessed for security vulnerabilities.

Or look at it another way – enterprises are blindly choosing to operate in a hostile environment for 63% of the business opportunities represented by software. If it were me, I would rather take off the blindfold and see exactly what I’m getting into. I can only hope that enterprise executives start feeling the same way.

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At Veracode, Jasmine’s efforts are focused around market research, content development and sales enablement efforts. Previously, Jasmine was a founding partner of Ptak/Noel, an industry analyst and marketing consulting firm. Prior to that she also served as director of systems and applications management at Hurwitz Group, and senior analyst at D.H. Brown Associates. Jasmine holds a bachelor of science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a master of science from the University of Southern California.

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